Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Canny edge detector



The Canny edge detector is an edge detection operator that uses a multi-stage algorithm to detect a wide range of edges in images. It was developed by John F. Canny in 1986. Canny also produced a computational theory of edge detection explaining why the technique works.




Canny edge detection is a technique to extract useful structural information from different vision objects and dramatically reduce the amount of data to be processed. It has been widely applied in various computer vision systems. Canny has found that the requirements for the application of edge detection on diverse vision systems are relatively similar. Thus, an edge detection solution to address these requirements can be implemented in a wide range of situations. The general criteria for edge detection include:
  1. Detection of edge with low error rate, which means that the detection should accurately catch as many edges shown in the image as possible
  2. The edge point detected from the operator should accurately localize on the center of the edge.
  3. A given edge in the image should only be marked once, and where possible, image noise should not create false edges.
To satisfy these requirements Canny used the calculus of variations – a technique which finds the function which optimizes a given functional. The optimal function in Canny's detector is described by the sum of four exponential terms, but it can be approximated by the first derivative of a Gaussian.
Among the edge detection methods developed so far, Canny edge detection algorithm is one of the most strictly defined methods that provides good and reliable detection. Owing to its optimality to meet with the three criteria for edge detection and the simplicity of process for implementation, it became one of the most popular algorithms for edge detection.

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